The problems of managing change

Many change programmes in effect fail right from the outset, because they do not create an adequate sense of direction.  Far too little effort is put into “painting the picture” as to why change is necessary, the impact of market forces and what will happen if changes are not made.  …

A perfect storm?

Two stories relating to social care have caught my eye in the last few days.  The first was an article in The Guardian which claims that the imminent crisis in the residential care home sector will dwarf the current problems of the UK steel industry.  The second comes from the …

The CQC, quality and culture

Over the last eighteen months or so the Care Quality Commission (CQC) has significantly changed the way it inspects health and social care providers, i.e. hospitals, care homes, domiciliary care services, mental health services, as well as expanding its remit, for example by now inspecting GP practices. Instead of the …

Corporate culture as pathological?

A while ago I wrote a number of posts relating to what I described as ‘corporate pathology’, and linking this closely with the ‘toxic’ environment that seemed to pervade the financial industry.  However, as I argued in one of these posts[1], the concept of a ‘pathological’ corporation or organisation is …

Can organisations make people ill?

In my previous post[1] I argued that rather than talk about corporate or organisational pathology it might make more sense to speak of corporate pathologisation or the pathological effects of corporate life.  Otherwise we end up treating the organisation itself as the pathological subject, which creates all kinds of conceptual …